Udaipur

February 19, 2008 - Udaipur, India

Dave:
The journey from Pushkar to Udaipur required a full day of traveling. It started with a short ride back to Ajmer where we switched to another local bus for the 'milk run' to Udaipur. The term local bus just means that GAP had purchased us seats on a regular bus and we would be traveling with others (picture Greyhound but not nearly as nice). About halfway through the trip people started standing in the aisles. At one point there were two young girls (I'm guessing 5 and 7) standing beside me. I motioned to there mother to see if I could  them biscuits. She smiled, shaking her head to be polite but the girls did not hesitate to take a couple each. There was another woman with a young toddler who appeared to be traveling with her brother (certainly seemed too young to be the father). I stood up and gave her my seat. After feeding the youngster she offered me the seat back but I didn't take it. The little boy took a liking to Joanne who I had been sitting beside. He climbed on her lap, playing with the buckles and straps of her day back. Joanne ended up holding the little guy for awhile. Once they got off I took my seat back...but not for long. A few minutes later, Charlie, a true gentleman and our oldest group member (I would guess Charlie is in his mid seventies) was frustrated that none of the locals had offered the woman and girls their seat so he began to stand up. I quickly jumped up and gave them my seat. The girls sat on the woman's lap. Joanne offered her lap for the one girl to lay down. Later on I gave the girls another biscuit. Someone else in our group had given them a piece of candy. Just before reaching their stop the girl who was on Joanne was now stretched across her with her head out the window being sick to her stomach. Yikes! It was probably motion sickness. I hope it wasn't the cookies! The whole journey from door to door took over nine hours, I stood for more than 3 of them. Poor Joanne spent those hours with kids on top of her and it was actually her birthday. When we got of the bus Charlie came up to me, grabbed my arm and said 'You have a good heart'. I said the same back to him. It was amazing and inspiring to see a man at  his age and physical condition offer to stand on a such a hot and rough bus ride.

We settled into the hotel which was quite nice. From there we walked to the main part of the old city. We stoped at a rooftop restaurant for dinner and drinks.  After a few days without beer and a very long bus ride the group was ready to help Joanne celebrate her birthday. It was the first time I ordered Chicken Tika and it was great! The food throughout India was really good. I probably put on a few extra pounds to prove it. After dinner we went to the garden bar of quite a fancy hotel near the place we were staying. We were just there for one drink but that was long enough for Joanne to get them to change the music to Punjabi and for her and Andrea to get some of the staff dancing.

The next day we went to the City Palace. It's the largest Palace in Rajastan and it was more intact than most we had seen. We walked to the fourth level, where the King stayed, and went out to the courtyard. There were full size trees growing in the middle of the Palace on the top floor. The guide then told us that the whole structure was built on a hilltop. The view from the Palace overlooked the Summer Palace (now a lake hotel) which sits in the middle of the lake. Past the lake and up on the top of a nearby mountain is the Monsoon Palace. I don't know but three Palaces within view of each other seems a little excessive.

After the Palace we had the rest of the day to ourselves. I was in desparate need of a massage as I hadn't had one yet on this trip and my back and neck were very stiff from the various modes of travel. I wasn't able to book a massage at the same place as a few of the others because it would have been too late so I found another place but it wasn't all that relaxing. It was in a cold basement. That evening I was leaving the group to meet a friend, Kelly, for drinks and dinner. Namita and I met Kelly last year on our Cambodia trip. She is Australian but is working for a Volunteer agency (teaching English to kids) just outside of Udaipur. Who would have thought a year and a half ago that I would meet an Austarlian in Cambodia and then see her again in India.

Kelly and I met at garden bar, where the group later had dinner, before she took me to a rooftop restaurant of a really nice restaurant. The view of the Lake, Palace and nearby hotels was very nice. It was great to get caught up with Kelly. What she is doing is truly amazing.

There was an option for the next day to go see some Temples outside of the city. It required a fair bit of driving and we had a very long trip the next day. Four of the group members decided to go while most of the rest of us elected to do a Yoga class in the morning followed by a cooking glass in the afternoon. The yoga class was good, however, I ripped my pants during a stretch early on which got a good laugh (too bad I didn't have my lululemon pants with me). The yoga part was probably just challenging enough (it was my second time ever doing yoga) and the meditation and relaxtion parts were good.

After the cooking class we strolled down to the lake where locals were washing on the sacred steps and also doing laundry by hand. I left the group to go to the 'local market' past our hotel, in the hopes of finding some good subject matter to shoot as the sun started to set. From there I did some internet before cleaning up for dinner at a place across the lake with a terrific view (the food was also very good).


Pictures

Resume Driving
Emergency Brake
Young Girl in Market Asking for her Photo
Putting in Time
 
 

2 Comments

March 14, 2008
Great, The city of udaipur is very beautiful. It is also called the Holy City. Ofcourse, while travelling the site seeing is very amazing.
March 18, 2008
The city of Udaipur is very beautiful. And one can be interested in the site seeing. It is also known as a Holy City.
Fuzzy Travel · Next »
Create blog · Login